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COVID-19 Infographics PPE

Lockdown eases, but the virus has not gone away.

Post originally on instagram

So things are opening up again this weekend (4th of July 2020) in the UK. The lockdown eases.

It is everyones individual choice where they wish to go now and what they want to do – if you are looking for ways to reduce risk while going out and seeing friends, here are some science-based suggestions:

Effective hand washing is still extremely important! Make sure you’re washing frequently and efficiently!

 Masks are still growing in evidence for their effect in slowing disease transmission. When you’re in close contact with people outside of your household, consider wearing one as often as you can!

Check out yesterday’s post for how to put on and wear your mask safely!

If possible, meet outdoors! Respiratory droplets have a reduced risk of reaching the people you’re with if you’re outside – a walk or a picnic are good alternatives to a sit-down meal.

Reduce the number of people you see in short spaces of time. By distancing the different groups you see you can reduce the number of potential infections in a social group.

Do you feel ready for when lockdown eases? Let us know your thoughts – info@thesciencesocial.com

lock down eases
lockdown is easing
The current state of cases
social distancing, hand washing and PPE advice for when lockdown eases
Meet outside when you can
Reduce the number of interactions in short spaces of time
second wave
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Infographics The Science Social News Uncategorized

Science News: 1st July 2020

‼️ SCIENCE NEWS ‼️

This week’s news in science brought to you by Serat @touchthebeardagain .

👩‍🔬 Scientists have developed a portable 30 minute COVID-19 testing machine

🦠 The 10th Ebola outbreak in the Democratic Republic of Congo has been declared over.

🧠 University of Liverpool lead a neuro-surveillance study to assess how COVID-19 affects brain function

🍭 Common food additive used in sweets has been found to have adverse effects

For a brief history of Ebola and details on the most recent Ebola outbreak, read our blog post here.

fasciola hepatica worm of the week
Infographics Worm of the Week

Worm of the Week: Fasciola hepatica

Concept by Shannan Summers @Shannan_tropmed, design by The Science Social.

The worm of the week is the good old Liver Fluke, specifically Fasciola hepatica. Worms are a type of parasite that can cause disease in humans and livestock!

Fasciola hepatica is an important zoonotic infection. Zoonotic means in this context means the worm has jumped from a non-human species to a human. 2 million human cases have been estimated worldwide!

Fasciola hepatica worm can be found all over the world, particularly in areas where sheep or cattle are farmed.

There is an acute phase of infection, and a chronic stage of infection. Depending on the phase of infection, the diagnosis differs.

For example, during an acute infection, the immature worms penetrate the gut (after ingestion). The body is able to produce an immune response, resulting in the presence of antibodies against the worms!? The presence of these antibodies are then detectable in a diagnostic test.

During a chronic infection, the worms have matured in the bile duct of the liver. The presence of the infection is detected by examining the faeces for eggs! – A glamorous diagnostic test, for sure!

Fasciola hepatica infections are often treated with antihelmintic drug triclabendazole. This drug works by expelling the worm by either stunning it or killing it. Without harm to the host, such as the human. However, drug resistance is becoming an issue?!

International women in engineering day 2020
Engineering Infographics Women in STEM

International Women in Engineering Day

Now in its 7th year, International Women in Engineering Day (INWED) aims to raise the profile of women engineers and encourage more people to consider engineering as a profession for all!

📊 In studies from 2018, women only made up just over 12% of the engineering workforce and only 25% of girls aged 16-18 would consider a career in engineering. .

👷‍♀️ Here are three influential women engineers from history through to today to get you started! How do you think they helped to “shape the world”? .

Mary Jackson, Gwynne Shotwell and Emily Warren Roebling.

Check out our fresh sip of science history post about Gerty Cori here.

science history
A Sip of Science History Infographics

A sip of science history: Gerty Cori

👨🏽‍🏫 A sip of science history! ⁣Introducing… Gerty Cori!

🔬 Gerty Cori was a pioneering biochemist and America’s first ever female Nobel Prize winner. ⁣

💫 Gerty and her husband Carl Ferdinand Cori, collaborated to define the process of sugar metabolism, known as the Cori Cycle. ⁣

👩🏻‍🔬 Despite her credentials she was denied many of the career opportunities her husband and collaborator was afforded because of her gender. Her contributions to science were eventually recognised, as she gained full professorship just months before her Nobel Prize success. ⁣

Swipe through to read more about Gerty’s story! ⁣

References:

COVID-19 Infographics PPE

How to use gloves correctly

Post originally on instagram 1.05.20

Let’s talk about gloves and how to use them correctly.

Wearing PPE is a way to prevent the spread of diseases, but only if used correctly.

We have discussed the risk of wearing masks incorrectly and how this can put you at more risk, tonight we focus on the correct usage of gloves. 🧤

  • Wash your hands thoroughly with soap and water, before AND after using gloves
  • If you are wearing gloves to protect yourself, the material of these gloves are very important.
  • Gloves should be changed frequently to reduce risk of spreading diseases
  • When removing your gloves, do it so your hands do not come into direct contact with the outside of the gloves.
  • Improper use of gloves increases the risk to you and those around you.
  • Good hand hygeine practice is a more favourable preventative measure.
  • PPE is in high demand in healthcare settings, social distancing and hygiene should always be adhered too.

Any questions are welcomed, as always.

More of our infographics on PPE here

COVID-19 Infographics

Glossary of a Pandemic

Post originally on instagram

The COVID-19 pandemic has brought a lot of terminology to people and understandably it can be confusing trying to keep up. So here is the glossary of a pandemic!

We’ve put together a quick glossary of common words to help you engage with articles and question topics as they come up.

Things like: what’s the difference between SARS-CoV-2 and COVID-19? 🦠

Who is a carrier? 👥

What does a ventilator do? 💨

What is herd immunity?

Use our glossary of a pandemic to help navigate through news and media about the pandemic!

Our definitions are split over 3 categories:

  • Viruses, Diseases and Patients
  • Testing, Tracing and Lab work
  • Treatments and Therapies
Glossary of a pandemic
Glossary of a pandemic
glossary viruses, diseases and patients
glossary testing tracing and lab work
glossary treatments and therapies

If you think we have missed any words or want us to add more to our glossary, let us know by dropping us an email at info@thesciencesocial.com or getting in touch on any of our social media platforms!

Why don’t you read some of our blog posts about COVID-19!

Or browse our infographics on COVID-19 here.

Infographics

World Malaria Day 2020

For World Malaria Day 2020 we have given you a breakdown on some key facts. Malaria is serious, life-threatening and is caused by a parasite that is spread by mosquitoes.

Pregnant women, infants, children under 5 years of age and patients with HIV/AIDS are at risk of severe disease.

In 2018 there were 228 million malaria cases worldwide and 405,000 malaria associated deaths. 93% of these cases were in Africa.

For world malaria day 2020 we did a break down on @who‘s key messages on malaria based upon the World Malaria Report, which is publicly available on their website.

Unfortunately, we are off track on some targets, and people are not getting access to the tools for preventing, detecting and treating malaria.
Campaigns such as “Zero malaria starts with me” that was launched in Senegal in 2014 have been endorsed by all African Heads of State. A campaign that engages all.

Despite not making crucial targets, there is some good news for some. In 2019, Algeria and Argentina were declared as malaria-free.
Interventions such as vector control and vaccine development are still ongoing with high hopes.

Are you into parasites? Check out our worm of the week here.

COVID-19 Infographics Q&A

The Science Social Q&A III

It’s question and answer time again! Here are some more of the questions we’ve been sent recently – if you have questions you want answered, message us or tag us in a post and we’ll add you to our next post!

ℂ𝕒𝕟 𝕪𝕠𝕦 𝕤𝕡𝕣𝕖𝕒𝕕 𝕥𝕙𝕖 𝕧𝕚𝕣𝕦𝕤 𝕨𝕚𝕥𝕙𝕠𝕦𝕥 𝕜𝕟𝕠𝕨𝕚𝕟𝕘? 🦠
Yes, you can – stay home whenever you are able!

𝕎𝕙𝕪 𝕒𝕣𝕖 𝕚𝕟𝕗𝕖𝕔𝕥𝕚𝕠𝕟/𝕕𝕖𝕒𝕥𝕙 𝕣𝕒𝕥𝕖𝕤 𝕤𝕠 𝕕𝕚𝕗𝕗𝕖𝕣𝕖𝕟𝕥 𝕓𝕖𝕥𝕨𝕖𝕖𝕟 𝕔𝕠𝕦𝕟𝕥𝕣𝕚𝕖𝕤? 📊
Tons of factors come into this, including population demographics, data reporting style and testing methods – it’s not necessarily anything to do with how patients are being treated.

𝕎𝕙𝕒𝕥 𝕥𝕪𝕡𝕖 𝕠𝕗 𝕤𝕠𝕒𝕡 𝕤𝕙𝕠𝕦𝕝𝕕 𝕀 𝕨𝕒𝕤𝕙 𝕞𝕪 𝕙𝕒𝕟𝕕𝕤 𝕨𝕚𝕥𝕙? 🧼
Any soap you can get! COVID-19 is caused by a virus, not bacteria, so antibacterial soap isn’t needed to get rid of it.

𝕎𝕙𝕒𝕥 𝕡𝕣𝕠𝕕𝕦𝕔𝕥𝕤 𝕔𝕒𝕟 𝕝𝕒𝕣𝕘𝕖 𝕗𝕒𝕤𝕙𝕚𝕠𝕟 𝕓𝕣𝕒𝕟𝕕𝕤 𝕒𝕔𝕥𝕦𝕒𝕝𝕝𝕪 𝕞𝕒𝕜𝕖? 👕
It depends a bit on what hospitals are willing to accept, but scrubs are simpler than masks – so they’re a good place to start if a manufacturer isn’t qualified to make complex medical equipment.

𝔻𝕠𝕖𝕤 𝕌𝕍 𝕝𝕚𝕘𝕙𝕥 𝕜𝕚𝕝𝕝 𝕧𝕚𝕣𝕦𝕤𝕖𝕤? 🌞
Yes – but the type of UV light used to kill microbes in a lab is also VERY harmful to humans. It’s absolutely not something people should be trying to replicate at home.

Find more Q&As here:

COVID-19 Infographics Q&A

Social Media Fact Check I

Following on from our recent Q&A, we’ve complied the most recent data available to give you an overview of the statistics. ⁣Our first social media fact check!

Swipe for our basic breakdown on⁣
📊 age and sex stats,⁣
🩺 incidence of pre-existing health conditions⁣
🏥 and why COVID-19 cases wouldn’t have been misreported as flu. ⁣


As always send us your questions, comments and queries ❣️⁣

Since making this infographic more information has come to light! Check out our blog post summarising a research article published in The BMJ here.

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