Did you know that there are over 1031 viruses on this earth…? That’s ten nonillion?!

You didn’t?

This is Virus of the Week:

The Science Social has made it their mission to introduce a virus each week to help raise general understanding of virology. We don’t think we will get through all the viruses through this series, just a select few.

Here are some of the things that you will learn about each virus that we chose to present to you each week:

  • Taxonomy
  • Etymology
  • Hosts
  • Cell tropism
  • Transmission
  • Pathology
  • “Did you know…?”
  • And of course, a reference list from peer reviewed articles so you can be assured, we are not making it up!

But wait… I don’t know what any of that means…

Taxonomy:

Taxonomy is a tool used by scientists to classify all living things. Think of it as a bit like a really big, detailed family tree which shows you how closely related each living thing is. This was developed by a Swedish botanist named Carolus Linnaeus back in the 18th century. In short, all living things are grouped into 7 Kingdoms of life; e.g. Animalia, Plantae, Fungi, Chromista, Protozoa, Archaea and Bacteria. Each Kingdom of life are then split further into Phylum > Class > Phylum > Order > Family > Genus > Species.

The scientific classification of a human is:

Domain: Eukaryota
Kingdom: Animalia
Phylum: Chordata
Class: Mammalia
Order: Primates
Family: Hominidae
Genus: Homo
Species: sapiens

I’m sure you are all familiar with Homo sapiens, well this is how we, as humans, fit into the taxonomy hierarchy.

Live Science give a good overview of taxonomy here!

The Taxonomy of Viruses though?!

The International Committee on Taxonomy of Viruses (ICTV) are responsible for developing, refining and maintaining a universal virus taxonomy. You can find more out about them here.

Etymology:

This one literally means, where did the name come from.

Hosts:

We will be discussing what hosts the virus of the week can replicate in. We will be looking at viruses where the humans are the main host, but also others too.

Cell tropism:

This is a fancy scientific way of saying, which cells in the body (or organism) the virus is “attracted” too. For example, this virus infects mainly these cells.

Transmission:

How is the virus transmitted?! Through the air? A vector (for example a mosquito or a tick…?), contaminated food or water?

Pathology:

What does the infection of this particularly look like in the form of disease?

Did you know?:

We thought we would throw in a fun fact… just to attempt at making this interesting.

Remember we have a virology section on our blog which you can find here!

We hope you enjoy virus of the week – we are really excited to share this with you!